Bringing “Homer” to Life


Burpee Museum of Natural History

Homer’s Odyssey: From the Badlands to Burpee

 

From the discovery and excavation of the first bones in Montana, to the preparation and reconstruction of the fossils in the lab, the new Homer’s Odyssey exhibit at the Burpee Museum of Natural History in Rockford, Illinois is the product of eight years of work.

 

Xibitz, along with content developer, Dan Bartlett, was entrusted to develop the permanent exhibit to meet the museum’s objectives of being fun, as well as educational and scientifically accurate. Xibitz created content that gives visitors glimpses into the biology and ecology of Homer’s day, over 66 million years ago, including a dynamic mount of the Triceratops Homer, a mural depicting life in the Cretaceous period by Paleo artist Michael Skrepnick and thirteen skulls that demonstrate both interspecies relationships and species growth from baby to adult.

 

The Burpee Museum of Natural History couldn’t have asked for a better firm to work with. The Xibitz team was innovative, flexible, and detailed. These qualities, along with their willingness to work with our in-house team led to the creation and installation of a dynamic, insightful, and wonderfully received exhibit.

—Hillary Parks, Grants & Projects Coordinator

 

[An experience of the ages, for all ages.

With tremendous visual appeal, Homer’s Odyssey also meets the museum’s goals of providing visitors
of multiple age groups and varied learning styles opportunities for hands-on/minds-on activities including tactile fossil samples and interactive flip-books.
]

 

X: on this project:

 Interpretive Planning

Content Development

 Conceptual & Detail Design

Financial Management

Artifact Mounting

Multimedia Integration

Fabrication & Installation

 

    Let’s Talk

 

Czech_1

The Xibitz team mounted nine Ceratopsian skulls to demonstrate the phylogeny, or course of development, in Ceratopsids like Homer.

 

Upon entering the gallery, visitors come face-to-face with Homer’s impressive frame. Homer is an excellent example of a sub-adult, or “teenage” Triceratops that lived 66 million years ago in the Cretaceous period.

 

Visitors admire specimens, among them a crocodile-like Champsosaurus and a turtle that lived during the same time period as Homer.